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"Mass Incarceration Affects us All"

Our committee is a proud member of the Virginia Prison Justice Network and a sponsor of VAPOC (Virginia Prisoner of Conscience).

Listen to the audio blog and take action!  Audio posts are by VAPOC members.  Blog posts are written by prisoners in Virginia.

Every day we get letters from prisoners.  We advocate for their human rights, provide information and address their grievances.  If you'd like to help, let us know!  Contact justicebburg@gmail.com

From behind these walls, parenting can be a very difficult job. But, it must be done if we want our children to be better than us. I know I do!
I strive to set the best example I can for my sons. They are my Young Kings, and soon they will be men. It saddens me deeply...

Over the course of my thirteen year period of incarceration, I cannot count how many roommates I have had. The majority were decent, though I've had my share of issues. That's just something one must accept when placed in a situation like this.  I am unsure of the way...


It is a tragedy how prisoners here in Virginia are deprived of the right to cohabitate with the the opposite sex, but what is even more tragic is the fact that people in society do not see this as cruel and unusual. In "Old Dominion" (Virginia) prisoners have never be...

September 11, 2018

A note from CFJ:  Mr. Goode's story is a compelling one that details his faith, a life of abuse and pain, and then, ultimately, transformation.  We are pleased to post Mr. Goode's story as it is one of survival and change and although we are not a religious organizatio...

Recently there was an attempted assault of a counselor at Aug*sta Correctional Facility where one prisoner allegedly exposed himself and attempted to assault a female but another prisoner saw what was happening and he intervened thereby stopping the attack. The news ha...

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The Coalition for Justice is a founding member of the Virginia Prison Justice Network (VAPJN) and a sponsor for VAPOC.

VAPJN is a network of organizations around the state who work for change in the prison system by seeking solutions to the judicial racism that plagues our criminal justice system and by also providing a platform for prisoners to be heard.  For more information on VAPJN, go here.

VAPOC, a prisoner led organization of prisoners and supporters, who seek to end mass incarceration in Virginia by promoting awareness among the incarcerated and those in society by enlightening them in the fields of Prison Justice, Law, Politics, and Community Rebuilding/Reentry, thereby motivating them to become more involved in the struggle for freedom, justice, and equality.  For more information on VAPOC go here.

The CFJ Prison Justice Committee believes that our current retributive justice system focuses on punishment, blame and isolation. Restorative justice focuses on healing and rehabilitation with an understanding that race and class are major factors in mass incarceration.  By allowing prisoners to take responsibility for their actions, they can not only repair harm but can learn how to make responsible choices and prevent future harm.  We need more dialogue, community support, inclusion and involvement.  We do not excuse criminal behavior by any means.  We believe in accountability but we see the need to treat prisoners with respect and allow them their human rights.  Only then, can they truly successfully reintegrate into the larger community.

We must all look in our communities and campuses to see the invisible hands that connect us -- from the prison made furniture at VT, to reintegrating prisoners back into our community in just and responsible ways.

Also, Virginia schools refer more students to law enforcement than other states, and that, nationally, schools refer black and special-needs kids to cops and courts disproportionately, at three times the national rate. The youth to prison pipeline starts here. We have state codes that include life without parole and  our state's 21 Day Rule, whereas an accuser can be charged with perjury and be free but the accused can't get out of prison because the rule prohibits trial judges from reviewing newly discovered evidence if it is presented more than three weeks after sentencing.

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To listen to earlier audio blog posts go to: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/sankofaradiocom

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