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"Mass Incarceration Affects us All"

Our committee is a proud member of the Virginia Prison Justice Network and a sponsor of VAPOC (Virginia Prisoner of Conscience).

Listen to the audio blog and take action!  Audio posts are by VAPOC members.  Blog posts are written by prisoners in Virginia.

Every day we get letters from prisoners.  We advocate for their human rights, provide information and address their grievances.  If you'd like to help, let us know!  Contact justicebburg@gmail.com

During my tenure as a prisoner I have witnessed some of the worst treatment of prisoners by way of their cuisine. On the box of the processed meat that we are fed is written the phrase "For Institutional Use Only." Recently studies have shown that eating too much of th...

Trump just signed for an increase of 4 billion dollars for missile defense, and hundreds of millions for other military expenses. How come we never see this same type of zeal toward education? In Virginia over 75% of the prison population have an education of high scho...



The rich get richer and the poor get poorer in this capitalistic society. The new tax bill is evidence of that. For the rich corporate executives the cut is permanent, reducing their rate from 35 to 21%, while the average family will see their rates increase in the n...


The outpouring of support for the Prison Reform Rally on January 20, 2018 in Richmond has been overwhelming. We are looking to truly make a difference like we never have before. It is time for us to take charge of our affairs and end mass incarceration for the benefit...

Power can corrupt, but absolute power corrupts absolutely. The white male patriarchal society that is America is being revealed for what it is. The power that has been realized by wealthy white men in this country (and also men of other ethnicities who have assimilated...

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The Coalition for Justice is a founding member of the Virginia Prison Justice Network (VAPJN) and a sponsor for VAPOC.

VAPJN is a network of organizations around the state who work for change in the prison system by seeking solutions to the judicial racism that plagues our criminal justice system and by also providing a platform for prisoners to be heard.  For more information on VAPJN, go here.

VAPOC, a prisoner led organization of prisoners and supporters, who seek to end mass incarceration in Virginia by promoting awareness among the incarcerated and those in society by enlightening them in the fields of Prison Justice, Law, Politics, and Community Rebuilding/Reentry, thereby motivating them to become more involved in the struggle for freedom, justice, and equality.  For more information on VAPOC go here.

The CFJ Prison Justice Committee believes that our current retributive justice system focuses on punishment, blame and isolation. Restorative justice focuses on healing and rehabilitation with an understanding that race and class are major factors in mass incarceration.  By allowing prisoners to take responsibility for their actions, they can not only repair harm but can learn how to make responsible choices and prevent future harm.  We need more dialogue, community support, inclusion and involvement.  We do not excuse criminal behavior by any means.  We believe in accountability but we see the need to treat prisoners with respect and allow them their human rights.  Only then, can they truly successfully reintegrate into the larger community.

We must all look in our communities and campuses to see the invisible hands that connect us -- from the prison made furniture at VT, to reintegrating prisoners back into our community in just and responsible ways.

Also, Virginia schools refer more students to law enforcement than other states, and that, nationally, schools refer black and special-needs kids to cops and courts disproportionately, at three times the national rate. The youth to prison pipeline starts here. We have state codes that include life without parole and  our state's 21 Day Rule, whereas an accuser can be charged with perjury and be free but the accused can't get out of prison because the rule prohibits trial judges from reviewing newly discovered evidence if it is presented more than three weeks after sentencing.

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February 7, 2020

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To listen to earlier audio blog posts go to: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/sankofaradiocom

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